Five Troubling Demand Creation Trends (and a Bonus MP3)

I just spoke at the High Rock Marketing Summit in Maryland, cialis hosted by High Rock Studios. Over 250 entrepreneurs and nonprofit executives participated, viagra and learned about the most effective ways to win the hearts and minds of their communities.
High Rock Summit keynote2

My keynote session, viagra entitled: “All The Right Moves: The New Rules of the Marketing Dance,” covered these key points:

1. Today’s buyers are dancing freestyle. They don’t want to be led. Today, even if you have the most elaborate tracking and analytics mechanisms, you can only see less than HALF of what customers are saying about you. The Atlantic found that people can talk about your company through email, Skype, and instant messaging—and nobody sees these messages. And big data server farms could be missing more than half of the information about your customers. Alexis Madrigal, a contributor to The Atlantic, found that in The Atlantic’s case, 56.5% of social traffic sources remained invisible to data analytics programs. She named this the “dark social” phenomenon.

2. Over-investing in digital marketing is like having two left feet. Human discernment, critical thinking skills, and live, face to face value exchange are still essential pieces of the marketing equation. An increasing number of my marketing clients are increasing their investments in live breakfast meetings, executive planning sessions, and customer advisory boards.

3. Great dancers don’t always wait for their partners to tell them what to do next. Neither should marketing leaders. If you wait for your CEO or CFO to tell you how to structure your marketing plan, you are an order taker, not a market maker. During planning meetings, marketers should be able to say “Here’s what the marketing plan looks like. Remember what metrics I showed you last quarter? Here’s the progress we made this quarter.’“ And the leading metrics you select should not be number of twitter followers, PR buzz, and number of new subscribers–unless you are a startup. High Rock Summit 1 book signing

4.  Dancers are willing to leap. When modern marketers take a leap of faith from “order taker” to “market maker,” they succeed by factoring all 7 areas into their planning and change process:

5. Dancers know their limitations. When a marketer embarks on a new initiative, such as predictive analytics, demand creation, Voice of the Customer, or other program, they need to first be honest about what changes are possible. The starting point is the true gap between your organization’s CORE values (the stated way you do things) and the OPERATING values (how things really get done).

The wider the gap, the less prepared your company will be to allow you to make that shift towards a strategic contributor and  advisor to the CEO.

Much like we have seen with Dancing with the Stars—which recently celebrated its 300th episode – we must be open to some freestyle thinking in order to be modern marketers. I have been a fan of the show for years. It is a great escape from the world of intellectual pursuits. When that show started 16 seasons ago, they judged the dancers on traditional dance: foxtrot, waltz, jive, and so on. Last season, we saw the Charleston, African Jazz, and Hip Hop take center stage.

This is a metaphor for who you need to be in this new, customer-driven marketing function. These principles guide us on the marketing dance floor.

If you would like a copy of my presentation, just drop me a note.

 

copyright 2014, Lisa Nirell. All rights reserved.

 

Market Maker Model 2014

I just spoke at the High Rock Marketing Summit in Maryland, nurse
hosted by High Rock Studios. Over 250 entrepreneurs and nonprofit executives participated, and learned about the most effective ways to win the hearts and minds of their communities.
High Rock Summit keynote2

My keynote session, entitled: “All The Right Moves: The New Rules of the Marketing Dance,” covered these key points:

1. Today’s buyers are dancing freestyle. They don’t want to be led. Today, even if you have the most elaborate tracking and analytics mechanisms, you can only see less than HALF of what customers are saying about you. The Atlantic found that people can talk about your company through email, Skype, and instant messaging—and nobody sees these messages. And big data server farms could be missing more than half of the information about your customers. Alexis Madrigal, a contributor to The Atlantic, found that in The Atlantic’s case, 56.5% of social traffic sources remained invisible to data analytics programs. She named this the “dark social” phenomenon.

2. Over-investing in digital marketing is like having two left feet. Human discernment, critical thinking skills, and live, face to face value exchange are still essential pieces of the marketing equation. An increasing number of my marketing clients are increasing their investments in live breakfast meetings, executive planning sessions, and customer advisory boards.

3. Great dancers don’t always wait for their partners to tell them what to do next. Neither should marketing leaders. If you wait for your CEO or CFO to tell you how to structure your marketing plan, you are an order taker, not a market maker. During planning meetings, marketers should be able to say “Here’s what the marketing plan looks like. Remember what metrics I showed you last quarter? Here’s the progress we made this quarter.’“ And the leading metrics you select should not be number of twitter followers, PR buzz, and number of new subscribers–unless you are a startup. High Rock Summit 1 book signing

4.  Dancers are willing to leap. When modern marketers take a leap of faith from “order taker” to “market maker,” they succeed by factoring all 7 areas into their planning and change process:

5. Dancers know their limitations. When a marketer embarks on a new initiative, such as predictive analytics, demand creation, Voice of the Customer, or other program, they need to first be honest about what changes are possible. The starting point is the true gap between your organization’s CORE values (the stated way you do things) and the OPERATING values (how things really get done).

The wider the gap, the less prepared your company will be to allow you to make that shift towards a strategic contributor and  advisor to the CEO.

Much like we have seen with Dancing with the Stars—which recently celebrated its 300th episode – we must be open to some freestyle thinking in order to be modern marketers. I have been a fan of the show for years. It is a great escape from the world of intellectual pursuits. When that show started 16 seasons ago, they judged the dancers on traditional dance: foxtrot, waltz, jive, and so on. Last season, we saw the Charleston, African Jazz, and Hip Hop take center stage.

This is a metaphor for who you need to be in this new, customer-driven marketing function. These principles guide us on the marketing dance floor.

If you would like a copy of my presentation, just drop me a note. 

copyright 2014, Lisa Nirell. All rights reserved.

 

Market Maker Model 2014

I just spoke at the High Rock Marketing Summit in Maryland, malady hosted by High Rock Studios. Over 250 entrepreneurs and nonprofit executives participated, and learned about the most effective ways to win the hearts and minds of their communities.

My keynote session, entitled: “All The Right Moves: The New Rules of the Marketing Dance,” covered these key points:

High Rock Summit keynote21. Today’s buyers are dancing freestyle. They don’t want to be led. Today, even if you have the most elaborate tracking and analytics mechanisms, you can only see less than HALF of what customers are saying about you. The Atlantic found that people can talk about your company through email, Skype, and instant messaging—and nobody sees these messages. And big data server farms could be missing more than half of the information about your customers. Alexis Madrigal, a contributor to The Atlantic, found that in The Atlantic’s case, 56.5% of social traffic sources remained invisible to data analytics programs. She named this the “dark social” phenomenon.

2. Over-investing in digital marketing is like having two left feet. Human discernment, critical thinking skills, and live, face to face value exchange are still essential pieces of the marketing equation. An increasing number of my marketing clients are increasing their investments in live breakfast meetings, executive planning sessions, and customer advisory boards.

High Rock Summit 1 book signing3. Great dancers don’t always wait for their partners to tell them what to do next. Neither should marketing leaders. If you wait for your CEO or CFO to tell you how to structure your marketing plan, you are an order taker, not a market maker. During planning meetings, marketers should be able to say “Here’s what the marketing plan looks like. Remember what metrics I showed you last quarter? Here’s the progress we made this quarter.’“ And the leading metrics you select should not be number of twitter followers, PR buzz, and number of new subscribers–unless you are a startup.

4.  Dancers are willing to leap. When modern marketers take a leap of faith from “order taker” to “market maker,” they succeed by factoring all 7 areas into their planning and change process:

Market Maker Model 2014

5. Dancers know their limitations. When a marketer embarks on a new initiative, such as predictive analytics, demand creation, Voice of the Customer, or other program, they need to first be honest about what changes are possible. The starting point is the true gap between your organization’s CORE values (the stated way you do things) and the OPERATING values (how things really get done).

The wider the gap, the less prepared your company will be to allow you to make that shift towards a strategic contributor and  advisor to the CEO.

Much like we have seen with Dancing with the Stars—which recently celebrated its 300th episode – we must be open to some freestyle thinking in order to be modern marketers. I have been a fan of the show for years. It is a great escape from the world of intellectual pursuits. When that show started 16 seasons ago, they judged the dancers on traditional dance: foxtrot, waltz, jive, and so on. Last season, we saw the Charleston, African Jazz, and Hip Hop take center stage.

This is a metaphor for who you need to be in this new, customer-driven marketing function. These principles guide us on the marketing dance floor.

If you would like a copy of my presentation, just drop me a note. 

copyright 2014, Lisa Nirell. All rights reserved.

 



I just spoke at the High Rock Marketing Summit in Maryland, help hosted by High Rock Studios. Over 250 entrepreneurs and nonprofit executives participated, troche and learned about the most effective ways to win the hearts and minds of their communities.

My keynote session, viagra entitled: “All The Right Moves: The New Rules of the Marketing Dance,” covered these key points:

High Rock Summit keynote21. Today’s buyers are dancing freestyle. They don’t want to be led. Today, even if you have the most elaborate tracking and analytics mechanisms, you can only see less than HALF of what customers are saying about you. The Atlantic found that people can talk about your company through email, Skype, and instant messaging—and nobody sees these messages. And big data server farms could be missing more than half of the information about your customers. Alexis Madrigal, a contributor to The Atlantic, found that in The Atlantic’s case, 56.5% of social traffic sources remained invisible to data analytics programs. She named this the “dark social” phenomenon.

2. Over-investing in digital marketing is like having two left feet. Human discernment, critical thinking skills, and live, face to face value exchange are still essential pieces of the marketing equation. An increasing number of my marketing clients are increasing their investments in live breakfast meetings, executive planning sessions, and customer advisory boards.

High Rock Summit 1 book signing3. Great dancers don’t always wait for their partners to tell them what to do next. Neither should marketing leaders. If you wait for your CEO or CFO to tell you how to structure your marketing plan, you are an order taker, not a market maker. During planning meetings, marketers should be able to say “Here’s what the marketing plan looks like. Remember what metrics I showed you last quarter? Here’s the progress we made this quarter.’“ And the leading metrics you select should not be number of twitter followers, PR buzz, and number of new subscribers–unless you are a startup.

4.  Dancers are willing to leap. When modern marketers take a leap of faith from “order taker” to “market maker,” they succeed by factoring all 7 areas into their planning and change process:

Market Maker Model 2014

5. Dancers know their limitations. When a marketer embarks on a new initiative, such as predictive analytics, demand creation, Voice of the Customer, or other program, they need to first be honest about what changes are possible. The starting point is the true gap between your organization’s CORE values (the stated way you do things) and the OPERATING values (how things really get done).

The wider the gap, the less prepared your company will be to allow you to make that shift towards a strategic contributor and  advisor to the CEO.

Much like we have seen with Dancing with the Stars—which recently celebrated its 300th episode – we must be open to some freestyle thinking in order to be modern marketers. I have been a fan of the show for years. It is a great escape from the world of intellectual pursuits. When that show started 16 seasons ago, they judged the dancers on traditional dance: foxtrot, waltz, jive, and so on. Last season, we saw the Charleston, African Jazz, and Hip Hop take center stage.

This is a metaphor for who you need to be in this new, customer-driven marketing function. These principles guide us on the marketing dance floor.

If you would like a copy of my presentation, just drop me a note. 

copyright 2014, Lisa Nirell. All rights reserved.

 



I recently hosted a conversation with Jascha Kaykas-Wolff, sales the CMO of MindJet in San Francisco, CA. My private CMO community participated in this call. We discussed The Future of Demand Creation.

In this session, Jascha and I shared our insights on:

  • 5 Major Shifts affecting your demand creation strategy
  • Advice for CMOs to thrive in this new reality
  • Our favorite demand creation resources

Jascha kaykas-wolffJascha shares his wisdom from his years of driving agile marketing innovation at Microsoft, Webtrends, and now MindJet. He spent the past several years refining the agile marketing process, and his success with driving demand and growth. During our discussion, we learned that, for less than $10,000, Jascha and his marketing team generated millions in qualified leads for sales.

These are the 5 major trends that could be sabotaging your demand creation strategies:

    1. Sales and marketing over-invest in business processes at the expense of connecting with their customers. In other words, marketing often defines demand creation as “creating materials to help foster leads, and to help salespeople have conversations with the leads.” But what they’re forgetting is the second part of that—what people should actually say when they engage a prospect. Tim Riesterer, CMO of Corporate Visions, says “when people talk about sales and marketing alignment, they usually start with demand generation and qualified leads. The real value lies in the message and the story.” Today’s modern marketers teach sales professionals how to ask permission to debate, expand their thinking, and show them the short- and long-term implications of conducting business as usual.
    2. Internal systems are not keeping up with changing customer behaviors. Michael Ni, CMO and Senior VP of Marketing and Products at Avangate, says that “customers have become savvier – they transact via more touch points (online, social, mobile, in-app, call center, direct sales, and resellers) than ever before, and they do far more research. Sometimes, they are better informed than a vendor’s sales teams. Today, B2C and B2B customer behavior have converged into what we call B2i (Business to individual). B2i customers expect pricing transparency and purchasing on their own terms.”
    3. Consensus decision-making is becomingde rigeur with buyers for big ticket purchases. I have noticed, particularly over the past five years, that senior corporate executives are unwilling to make as many bold moves without conferring with their teams. They seek buy-in before they will announce a strategic initiative, often causing unnecessary delays and missed opportunities to be first to market.
    4. Sales teams have less influence than they did five years ago. In most instances,sales teams are responsible for guiding fewer stages of the buying cycle. Research firms estimate that between 60%-70% of the buying decision is completed before a salesperson is allowed to meet the buyer. By that stage, many buyers are nearly ready to negotiate. It’s similar to how we buy cars. We walk into the dealer, armed with specifications and consumer reports, and we are ready to negotiate. Some of us buy big ticket items online today. In cases like these, relationship selling has taken a back seat.
    5. The cost of attaining true “sales and marketing harmony” can be prohibitive. Within my CMO community, I have not found one marketing organization that operates at optimal levels across every possible discipline. You need several components to optimize the customer experience, some of which did not exist five years ago:

 

    • Marketing automation
    • Lead and opportunity scoring
    • Events planning
    • Content creation
    • CRM
    • Inside teleprospecting
    • Predictive analytics

Which of these troubling trends is affecting your demand creation initiatives? Share your comments here. My future posts, and next book, will outline strategies to thrive in this new reality.

To learn more about our discussion, and how top marketers are overcoming these challenges, listen to this MP3 excerpt. You can download the entire replay by joining Making Marketing Waves™.  Learn more here.

Copyright 2014, Lisa Nirell. All rights reserved.

You will also enjoy these posts:

5 Ways Marketing Can Turbocharge Sales
The Secret Ingredients to a Stellar 2014 Marketing Plan
How to be an Innovative Marketer

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