Category: Marketing innovation

Jason just saw five years of hard work go down the tubes.

As a CMO of a public company, he has invested five years of emotional capital and energy into team development and recognition.

Yet his team wasn’t immune to the spoils of The Great Resignation.

He just reported 47% turnover within the marketing team. Other departments weren’t proud of their turnover rates, either.

That’s turmoil in a nutshell.

How can we tame turmoil when world events swirl around us?…

We’re living in a time of marketing liminality.  Some leaders feel as if they have one hand clinging to their Zoom rooms and one hand clinging to a dusty office HQ desk.

This messy middle moment is fueled by ever-changing customer expectations, dynamic workplace configurations, and  high team turnover. (I started to see these challenges emerge in 2018 and published 3 posts about them here.)

There is a silver lining to this liminal marketing moment….

Whether you work for a museum or MarTech company, one thing remains constant: too many marketers still believe that a poor digital or physical experience won’t hurt their brand. 

Just think about how many retailers you recently visited, and how deeply disappointed you felt by the experience. If you’re like me, you probably walked out empty-handed, grabbed your phone, and chose to order online. The online experience was less painful and annoying.

Don’t let this happen to your brand….

Looking back at 2021, career shifting became the norm. Marketing leadership roles are abundant right now.

I’m not surprised–PwC’s 2021 Future of Work survey revealed that 65% of employees are looking for a new job. Also, in 2021, over half of my clients were either promoted or changed jobs.

Landing that new role or promotion can be very energizing. You typically have just 90 days to make your mark as an innovator, not just a doer….

Two years into the pandemic, things still feel heavy. To cope, some professionals have turned to self-medication versus meditation (or other healthy habits).

For many of us marketers, our creative candles have flamed out.

Instead of focusing on discussing the theme, “The Great Resignation,” what if we made 2022 “The Year of PLAY?”

In Episode 51, we explore the connection of PLAY to performance with my colleague, Gary Ware.

You may think I’m glossing over the severity of the pandemic….

The dictionary defines “legacy” as leaving an inheritance or property after death. That term is simply outdated.

We need to make an impact while we are alive and vibrant. And I believe that CMOs are not the only leaders who should consider a new approach to living their legacy. Here’s why…

Today, our teams and loved ones no longer expect a clear, predictable, 20 year strategic plan. Those days are over. 

They want to follow courageous leaders with a growth mindset. …

You might think that the pandemic is the true cause of many of us focusing on short-term issues and being reactionary.

But I have news for you.

For the years I’ve been advising Chief Marketing Officers and CEOs, this problem has haunted them.

Too much short-term thinking can severely limit your career as well as your best-laid marketing strategies.

In this episode, I share the screen with Dorie Clark. She is a prolific entrepreneur, professor, standup comedienne, communications coach, and Author of The Long Game.

Many people call themselves managers, but the word “manager” has undersold leadership for a very long time. In this episode, I share the screen with Don McGuire, the CMO of Qualcomm. He discusses how to creatively and proactively engage teams in today’s hybrid settings, marketing and connecting effectively with customers and strategic partners in the digital world, and leadership strategies that no longer work.

Many CMOs and CEOs ask me how I help clients (especially marketers) leap from “order takers” to growth champions.

It starts with looking at your team’s culture and growth mindset and taking steps to improve your “rapid customer value”.

Most of us are clamoring to return to face-to-face events and conferences. Yet conference planners and attendees are not necessarily on the same page. Valuegraphics, a noted research firm out of Vancouver, Canada, recently did a study of 1850 very avid conference goers. Here’s what David Allison and his research team discovered: there is dissonance.

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