I recently learned a new term: liminality. It’s defined as a quality of ambiguity or disorientation that occurs in the middle stage of rituals. In today’s working world, it’s common for people to change jobs over a dozen times in their lives. And some can be significant career shifts, not lateral career moves. Yet many of us rush to the next “new thing,” never allowing us to feel complete and whole with our past.

If each of us can expect to change jobs over a dozen times, and be truly present in our new role, we must embrace that temporary period of liminal life….

In my experience advising CMOs, I listen for whether they have a growth mindset or an output mindset. If they are focused on looking busy and launching loads of programs, their tenure will be short—or they will stay squarely in the “marcom and programs” role. The first people who notice their output behavior will be the CEO and the board of directors.

We’re pleased to invite you to our 4th annual  CMOs Leading Innovation Conference (CLIC ’18), October 3-4 in Atlanta, GA.  CLIC ’18 Early Bird rates now available (a $250 savings) through June 15, 2018.

This year’s conference theme is “Innovation Meets Experience.” And you will experience marketing innovation first-hand—by participating in actual field trips to meet some cool Atlanta organizations. 

One of the biggest obstacles to marketing innovation and relevancy sits between our ears. I call it “legacy thinking.” My clients constantly complain that their teams over-identify with old projects and programs. They feel threatened when those programs need to be scrutinized or eliminated altogether. That “legacy thinking” overshadows any chance of a marketing innovation breakthrough.

We advise CMOs and CEOs on accelerating marketing innovation and growth, and I’m excited when clients can overcome this obstacle.

Their journey is similar to the disruption other industries are facing….

CMOs are expected to be brand ambassadors and masterful communicators. As you assess your abilities in that area, ask yourself: are you making it easy for people to engage with you—or are you creating confusion?

Customer experience mastery—not Martech nor AI—is the new black. Now is the ideal time for marketing leaders to incorporate customer experience mindsets and actions into every facet of their marketing plans and conversations.

These guidelines don’t just apply to billion-dollar behemoths. They work for small and mid-market companies, too. Here is a recap of our private Marketing Leaders of DC session featuring the “godmother” of customer experience, Jeanne Bliss.

Today’s post is a special preview of the content in our newest LinkedIn Learning Course, “The Effective CMO.” Be sure to check out the course; you can view a video sample and get more details here.

Whether you’re a seasoned CMO or an aspiring one, you’re probably no stranger to endless conversations related to CMO turnover. A global survey by the Fournaise Marketing Group revealed that 80% of CEOs don’t trust, or are unimpressed with, their CMOs….

The world is in need of more time to reflect and think before acting. That goes double for marketers. There are a lot of changes going on in the marketing profession. Customers are feeling it — they’re barraged with information. And I don’t believe tech is the answer.

I recently spoke with Lee Price of Managing Editor about being mindful at work. We explored the the challenges of being connected constantly by technology without being distracted….

Ever wonder why some leaders avoid taking risks in their roles, and default to status quo? I have a theory about this. I believe that without strong personal financial confidence, every decision, no matter how small, feels risky. Leaders lose the ability and courage to garner budget commitment and innovate.

I see a clear connection between the tolerance for calculated risk and financial confidence. Here is how my theory evolved.

Last summer, our financial adviser of 13 years changed careers, leaving us with “Gary,” a new broker….

Now is the time to explore, identify, and implement proactive marketing strategies. Waiting another 1-2 months may be too late. These are some strategic questions to ask during your next marketing planning meeting.